The Express

UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

It was revealed today the process can be invoked by British law, under the Royal Prerogative.

The timing of Article 50 will be a matter for the prime minister elected by Conservative Party members on September 9.

But law firm Mishcon de Reya has launched legal action on behalf of a group of anonymous clients, arguing that an Act of Parliament will be required to deploy Article 50.

Cabinet minister Oliver Letwin, who is heading a Whitehall Brexit Unit to prepare the way for negotiations told the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, has said the issue is almost certain to end up with the courts.

Mr Letwin told the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee: “It is entirely a matter for the new administration to take how to conduct the entire negotiations, and obviously part of that decision is about when to trigger Article 50.”

There were “conflicting views” over whether Article 50 can be invoked under prerogative powers or required parliamentary approval, said Mr Letwin.

Mr Letwin said the issue was “academic” because the withdrawal process will also involve either repealing or amending the 1972 European Communities Act, which will require debates and votes in both Houses of Parliament.

But Mr Letwin said government lawyers had already begun work on assessing how to repeal the European Communities Act , the 1972 legislation that forms the basis of the UK’s membership.

He told the House of Lords EU committee Article 50 could be triggered by the PM without Parliament’s authority but “in order finally to leave the EU we need to repeal or hugely amend the European Communities Act”.

He said: ”In order to do that by the time that we are proposing to leave, clearly one needs to start what is quite a long parliamentary process at quite an early stage, which is why I have asked parliamentary counsel already to begin looking at what is involved in repeal or substantial amendment of the European Communities Act.”

Europe Minister David Lidington hinted that talks were under way about the possibility of giving up the UK’s presidency of the European Council.

Under the rotating presidency system, the UK is scheduled to be in charge of the EU’s agenda in July-December 2017.

Mr Lidington told the peers: “It is an issue that has not yet been fully resolved.”

But he said he had discussed the issue with his counterparts in Estonia and Malta – the two countries which hold the presidency either side of the UK’s term.

He said: “Discussions are ongoing.”

Mr Letwin told the Committee that his unit would not make recommendations to the incoming PM, but would build a team of negotiators for “complicated and arduous” talks, identify specific issues affecting different sectors during the Brexit process and draw up options for future action.

He told the House of Lords EU committee Article 50 could be triggered by the PM without Parliament’s authority but “in order finally to leave the EU we need to repeal or hugely amend the European Communities Act”.

He said: ”In order to do that by the time that we are proposing to leave, clearly one needs to start what is quite a long parliamentary process at quite an early stage, which is why I have asked parliamentary counsel already to begin looking at what is involved in repeal or substantial amendment of the European Communities Act.”

Europe Minister David Lidington hinted that talks were under way about the possibility of giving up the UK’s presidency of the European Council.

Under the rotating presidency system, the UK is scheduled to be in charge of the EU’s agenda in July-December 2017.

Mr Lidington told the peers: “It is an issue that has not yet been fully resolved.”

But he said he had discussed the issue with his counterparts in Estonia and Malta – the two countries which hold the presidency either side of the UK’s term.

He said: “Discussions are ongoing.”

Mr Letwin told the Committee that his unit would not make recommendations to the incoming PM, but would build a team of negotiators for “complicated and arduous” talks, identify specific issues affecting different sectors during the Brexit process and draw up options for future action.

RTnews reports

https://www.rt.com/uk/360843-brexit-article-50-2017/

Growing evidence indicates the British government will invoke Article 50 to trigger Brexit early next year, despite Prime Minister Theresa May refusing to comment on a timetable

May reportedly told Martin McGuinness, Northern Ireland’s deputy first minister, she would get the ball rolling “early next year,” it emerged on Tuesday.

Speaking at an event at the Labour Party annual conference in Liverpool, Sinn Fein’s McGuinness said:“I asked her about when she will trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty [and she said] that she was going to do it not this year but very early next year.

“So we are working on the basis that early next year, the article will be triggered,” he said, Politics Home reports.

May is believed to have made similar comments to Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, when the pair held talks at 10 Downing Street earlier this month.

“Prime Minister May was very open and honest with me,” Tusk said at a summit in Slovakia, according to Bloomberg.

“She declared that it’s almost impossible to trigger Article 50 this year but it’s quite likely that they will be ready maybe in January, maybe in February next year.”

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson was publicly admonished by the UK government last week for saying Article 50 would be invoked between January and May 2017.

Speaking to the BBC, he said it would seem odd if British citizens ended up voting in the European Parliament elections in May 2019, indicating he thought the government should trigger the two-year process by May 2017.

“If you think about it there are obviously Euro elections coming down the track. I think people will be wondering whether we want to send a fresh batch of UK Euro MPs to an institution which we are, after all, going to be leaving.”

He made similar comments to Sky News, saying: “We are talking to our European friends and partners in the expectation that by the early part of next year we will see an Article 50 letter.”

However, Johnson’s comments were shot down by a government spokesperson, who said: “The government’s position is clear.

“The prime minister has said she will not trigger Article 50 before the end of the year. Ultimately it’s her decision.”

 

The decision is made its now time for the so called democracy which we have not really had for many years morr an illision.

 

 

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